Report: Honda Engineers Berated Takata Ahead of Scandal Erupted

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Bloomberg (via Automotive News) reported that engineers at Honda demanded to know why Takata airbags had been injuring drivers and passengers during a 2009 meeting held 4 months ahead of investigators started their inquiry.

“Why does it explode? I want to know the truth,” an engineer identified as “Otaka” asked Takata’s CEO at the meeting, according to Bloomberg.

Minutes from a July 2009 meeting amongst Honda executives and Takata officials have been produced public as element of a lawsuit against the airbag maker.

Federal regulators Wednesday identified the ninth fatality linked to the defective airbags, which could burst so violently that they could spray metal shards into the passenger cabin. National Highway Visitors Security Administration officials mentioned the victim was a minor driving a 2001 Honda Accord close to Pittsburgh in July, according to USA Nowadays.

The teen was hospitalized and died a number of days soon after the crash, according to investigators.

Honda was Takata’s largest customer and owned 1.2 percent of the auto supplier when investigators began examining the defective airbags, according to Bloomberg.

In 2009, when the companies met outside Los Angeles, engineers at Honda accused Takata officials of becoming too slow to act and not treating the predicament seriously.

The documents were unsealed as portion of a Florida woman’s lawsuit against Takata and show that, as far back as 2005, engineers at Takata notified the company of falsified data and the company’s illegal practices.

According to the report, a Takata engineer named Bob Schubert wrote that the business was “prettying up” information about its airbags and that the firm was lying about testing: “It has come to my focus that the practice has gone beyond all affordable bounds and likely constitutes fraud,” he wrote in 2005, according to Bloomberg.

Honda, along with 11 other automakers, are recalling much more than 19 million vehicles — with far more than 23 million faulty inflators — in a single of the biggest recalls in history. NHTSA officials in November fined Takata far more than $ 70 million, which could rise to $ 200 million if the organization can’t fulfill its obligations.


The Truth About Automobiles » Vehicle Critiques

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