If You Can Handle a Color From 1970, You Could Be Dodge Material

2016 Dodges in Go Mango

The paint — erm, act could be wearing thin.

In its latest nod to the heady and far-out past, Dodge will let you have your Challenger or Charger SRT 392 or Hellcat in its newest resurrected color, “Go Mango.”

Joining other blast-from-the-past(els) like “Plum Crazy,” Go Mango was offered for the first time on the 1970 Challenger — a legendary car from a truly great year, assuming you weren’t in Vietnam or a Jimi Hendrix fan.

If paint color has been holding you back from shelling out dough on a 707-horsepower car, the wait is over. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles says dealers can start taking orders immediately.

If some unlucky soul were to have traveled forward in time from 1970 (assuming they weren’t looking for surgery), the word “Fiat” in the company’s title probably wouldn’t be the only shocking thing about life in 2016.

In 1970, the Charger was strictly a two-door, but there were four other Dodge sedans to choose from: Monaco, Coronet, Polara and Dart. And the Dart actually sold, as opposed to being such a anchor that its parent is trying to have it adopted.

It’s an odd situation when a mainstream automaker finds itself only really satisfying the large (and fast) end of the market, but that’s where we are, at least until another automaker starts cranking out modern-day versions of the midsize Spirit or Stratus for FCA.

Still, if your best memories are from the pre-Environmental Protection Agency days of big displacement, big fuel consumption and big sideburns, chances are a classic nameplate mixed with retro colors and a huge horsepower figure is going to make you feel mighty happy.

And that makes you … Dodge Material.

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Junkyard Locate: 1970 Ford Econoline Van

00 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

The Ford Econoline went from getting a forward-control/mid-engine layout to sporting a stubby hood with the engine moved a bit forward for the 1968 by way of 1974 model years. Every single time I see a single of these vans in a wrecking yard, it has been so completely employed up that I feel compelled to break out my camera so far in this series we have seen this ’70 cargo van, this ’70 passenger van, this STD-laden ’71 custom, and this extraordinarily biohazardous-hunting ’72 camper (plus there’s this grainy black-and-white Econoline photo I shot in 1991, this complete-on Southern California custom found in northern Sweden, and this time-capsule Denver customized ’74).

Right now, we have this beat-to-hell-and-beyond California passenger-van-turned-operate-truck.
06 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

You could get versions of this sticker for your vehicle, motorcycle, bicycle, or surfboard back in the 1970s and 1980s.

24 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

At some point, a person with sheet metal, a riveting tool, body filler, and spray paint covered up the left-side glass, generating the really uncommon Half-and-Half Molester Van alternative package.

22 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

Shelves and toolboxes had been installed on that side, or perhaps we are seeing a extremely un-luxurious camper conversion here.

23 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

Rather than go to the hassle of covering up the rear windows, the owner who did the side-glass-covering job just found junkyard cargo-van doors to replace the window-equipped passenger-van doors that have been on this Econoline when it rolled off the showroom floor.

21 - 1970 Ford Econoline van in California junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

These “splatter” stickers had been popular J.C. Whitney items, circa 1982.


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