Ford Super Duty Owner Gets Refund Following Diesel Pickup Grows Afterburner

Ford F-450 exhaust (Facebook)

If the dome light in Shelley Shields’ Ford F-450 Super Duty stopped operating, she could easily have read a book by the hellish glow emanating from underneath her pickup.

The Cochrane, Alberta driver returned the 6.7-liter Power Stroke diesel-powered automobile shortly soon after buy after noticing flames shooting from the tailpipe and the exhaust glowing like a certain component of Amsterdam, Truck Trend reports.

Pictures posted to Shield’s Facebook page show the circumstance underneath — and behind — the pickup. Fantastic for melting driveway ice, but certainly unsettling for the owner.

14713703_1418966061467862_137400714507110002_n

When Shields contacted Ford Canada for a repair, the automaker referred her back to her dealer. Fortunately for Shields, the people at Carstairs Ford didn’t take her for a ride. They offered to take back the car and handed Shields a full refund.

Whilst the owner walked away satisfied and no neighborhood cats identified themselves toasted, the trigger of the Ford’s red-hot pipe had forum posters questioning if the truck’s original equipment was to blame. The six.7-liter Power Stroke’s 6.4-liter predecessor was when recalled for diesel particulate filter overheating, but the automaker claims this glowing Super Duty is a one particular-off.

14732176_1418965981467870_5304060662952047203_n

In a statement, Ford North American Trucks and Industrial Automobiles Communications Manager Jiyan Cadiz claims the issue doesn’t stem from the factory.

“We have completed our initial investigation into the Super Duty in Canada and have determined it was brought on by an incorrect repair soon after the truck was made,” said Cadiz. “We are not aware of any other incidents, and we are taking action to avert this from happening in the future. In this unique case, the consumer returned the affected truck and received a refund.”

“Incorrect repair” is a lot vague, but Ford forum posters claim they know the actual trigger. Diesel fuel poured into the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) tank throughout the pre-delivery inspection gets the blame, though it can’t be confirmed. If a technician did make such a whoopsies, it would primarily turn the exhaust system into an afterburner.

[Images: Facebook]

Vehicle Critiques – The Truth About Cars