Uh Oh, the U.S. Found One more Emissions-cheating Device in Audi Autos

exhaust

A U.S. regulator has come across another emissions-cheating device on a Volkswagen Group product. This is not much more of the exact same — rather, it is an entirely different apparatus used on autos until effectively after the company’s diesel emissions scandal became public expertise.

This is not a wonderful time for Volkswagen to be caught with its pants down for not disclosing anything they had been already in huge trouble for. With the company trying to wrap issues up with the Department of Justice, the new report from German outlet Bild am Sonntag could sour things.

According to the paper, the California Air Sources Board found the new emissions-cheating application four months ago. Sonntag claims the computer software was installed in vehicles with certain automatic transmissions, and sensed whether a car’s steering wheel was being turned. A stationary wheel is indicative of a stationary platform, like these employed for testing purposes.

During these circumstances the car ran a different shifting system, a single that reduced carbon dioxide emissions and all round fuel consumption. Turning the wheel 15 degrees in any direction canceled the program entirely, returning the car to its typical mode for road use.

The paper states that the device had been implemented in several hundred thousand Audi cars equipped with automatic transmissions, like the Q5, A6, and A8. The usage of the device was discontinued in May of 2016, which is a complete eight months after Volkswagen’s emissions scandal became public expertise.

Nether CARB or Audi have been available for comment on this morning’s report.

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Audi to Buy Back 25,000 3.-Liter Diesel Models in U.S.: Report

2012 Audi Q7 white

A German newspaper claims that Audi will get back 25,000 U.S. autos sold with a 3.-liter diesel V6 engine.

According to a story published in Der Spiegel, the automaker has determined the cars can not be fixed, Reuters reports. A total of 85,000 Audi, Porsche and Volkswagen automobiles include the exact same emissions-cheating defeat device identified in the automaker’s 2.-liter TDI engines, which are currently in the procedure of being purchased back.

The brief report claims the impacted automobiles are “older-generation cars” that will not pass emissions tests, but does not specify which models.

Audi USA claims the Environmental Protection Agency’s notice of violation extends to 5 models sold in the U.S.: the 2009-2016 Q7 and 2014-2016 model year Q5, A8L, A7 quattro and A6 quattro vehicles. Of these, the Q7 is the most plentiful.

In response to the report, the automaker released a statement from its American workplace:

“We are functioning tough with U.S. regulators to reach an agreement an authorized resolution for affected three.-liter V-six TDI cars and thank our clients for their continued patience. The Court has scheduled a status conference for November 3, 2016 to go over the matter further.”

Till now, all of the three.-liter autos stayed have been in limbo as parent organization Volkswagen sought out a fix for the high-end models, hoping to avoid a costly buyback. The fines and buyout fees associated with the two.-liter buyback leading $ 16.five billion.

In August, the U.S. District Court judge overseeing Volkswagen’s American settlement issued an ultimatum demanding the automaker show regulators a repair for the three.-liter engine and forcing it into settlement talks. Regulators soundly rejected a preceding fix proposal. Audi previously mentioned any fix would contain software updates and modifications to the vehicles’ emissions equipment.

The question now is: how a lot of non-Audi models will now grow to be subject to a buyback?

[Image: Audi AG]

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Feinberg: Volkswagen Will Offer ‘Generous Solution’ to U.S. Customers

Kenneth Feinberg, Generous Solution Quote

Kenneth Feinberg, the man behind Volkswagen’s claims fund, stated American VW TDI customers should expect an offer that will make them very happy in an interview published this weekend.

When asked by Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung (via Reuters) what he will offer the more than 500,000 Americans who own dirty diesels, he replied, “I can promise that there will be a generous solution.”

What that solution will be is anyone’s guess, including Feinberg’s.

“The jury is still out, and at the moment all options are up for debate: cash payments, buybacks, repairs, replacements with new cars,” he said.

The solution will likely include a mix of measures as there are different generations of the EA189 engine at the center of the Volkswagen diesel emissions scandal

Late last year, Volkswagen began its Goodwill Package program to help smooth over concerns in the short term. At the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Volkswagen Group of American CEO Michael Horn announced that the company’s Goodwill Package program would be extended to owners of 3-liter diesel vehicles, and that some 265,000 owners had taken Volkswagen up on the offer to date.

For its part, Audi is offering a carbon copy of Volkswagen’s 2-liter Goodwill Package program, but has not extended that offer to 3-liter vehicles. Neither has Porsche.

Final measures, above and beyond the Goodwill Package program, are dependant on future decisions by the Environmental Protection Agency, said Feinberg.

“My hands are tied while VW and the authorities resolve their differences. The original time frame could be delayed.”

However, those looking for compensation due to possible effects on their health aren’t likely to get much from the Feinberg administered fund.

“I have not decided yet, but I am inclined not to accept such claims and to tell people they should sue if they want,” he said.

[Photo source: Flickr/Miller Center]


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